Adding Flavor to Low-Fat MealsC³mo realzar el sabor de las comidas con poca grasa

Adding Flavor to Low-Fat Meals

Image
Make your own stock and soups from fresh ingredients using herbs and spices for flavoring.

There are endless ways to add more variety and flavor to your diet, without using salt or high-fat ingredients.

  • Keep plenty of fresh fruit on hand and experiment with adding it to your main dishes. For example, peaches go well with chicken and can be a very flavorful addition to chicken casseroles or roasted poultry. Bananas or raisins add authenticity and flavor to curry dishes with a Caribbean flair.

  • Look for fruits and vegetables you haven't tried before when you go shopping. Often, especially with the more exotic or unusual items, recipes or suggestions about their use will be displayed in the produce department.

Image
Coat meats, poultry, and fish with mixtures of dry or fresh herbs and spices (rubs) before grilling or baking. The flavors will diffuse into the food as it cooks.

  • Check out the cookbook section on your next trip to the bookstore or library. Many of the distinctive and inviting flavors we associate with Thai, African, or Caribbean dishes come from the blends of seasonings used in their preparation. If you try one new recipe a week, you'll soon know what spices to add to a dish to give it the taste of exotic places.

  • Marinate meats, poultry, and fish in mixtures of wine, fruit juice, low-sodium tomato juice, vinegar, lemon juice, herbs, and spices before grilling or baking. Soy sauce and teriyaki sauce are high in sodium-use low-sodium varieties and use a smaller quantity. Ginger, dry sherry, and sesame seeds can also add Asian flavor to foods.

Publication Source: Dept. of Health and Human Services and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Publication Source: Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion. U.S. Department of Agriculture

Online Source: Dept. of Health and Human Services and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Online Source: Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion. U.S. Department of Agriculture

Date Last Reviewed: 2007-01-15T00:00:00-07:00

Date Last Modified: 2002-07-09T00:00:00-06:00

Adding Flavor to Low-Fat MealsC³mo realzar el sabor de las comidas con poca grasa

Adding Flavor to Low-Fat Meals

Image
Make your own stock and soups from fresh ingredients using herbs and spices for flavoring.

There are endless ways to add more variety and flavor to your diet, without using salt or high-fat ingredients.

  • Keep plenty of fresh fruit on hand and experiment with adding it to your main dishes. For example, peaches go well with chicken and can be a very flavorful addition to chicken casseroles or roasted poultry. Bananas or raisins add authenticity and flavor to curry dishes with a Caribbean flair.

  • Look for fruits and vegetables you haven't tried before when you go shopping. Often, especially with the more exotic or unusual items, recipes or suggestions about their use will be displayed in the produce department.

Image
Coat meats, poultry, and fish with mixtures of dry or fresh herbs and spices (rubs) before grilling or baking. The flavors will diffuse into the food as it cooks.

  • Check out the cookbook section on your next trip to the bookstore or library. Many of the distinctive and inviting flavors we associate with Thai, African, or Caribbean dishes come from the blends of seasonings used in their preparation. If you try one new recipe a week, you'll soon know what spices to add to a dish to give it the taste of exotic places.

  • Marinate meats, poultry, and fish in mixtures of wine, fruit juice, low-sodium tomato juice, vinegar, lemon juice, herbs, and spices before grilling or baking. Soy sauce and teriyaki sauce are high in sodium-use low-sodium varieties and use a smaller quantity. Ginger, dry sherry, and sesame seeds can also add Asian flavor to foods.

Publication Source: Dept. of Health and Human Services and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Publication Source: Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion. U.S. Department of Agriculture

Online Source: Dept. of Health and Human Services and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Online Source: Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion. U.S. Department of Agriculture

Date Last Reviewed: 2007-01-15T00:00:00-07:00

Date Last Modified: 2002-07-09T00:00:00-06:00

Testimonials

crts-img

"I so appreciate Dr Lisa. She is hands down the most thorough doctor I have encountered yet- anytime I have any real concerns regarding my health, I make the extra effort to see Dr Lisa, even though I now live an hour away. I really appreciate that Dr Lisa listens to her patients' concerns, and covers all bases in addressing them, on all level."
~MR

Read More